Micro Dosing Magic Mushrooms have had quite a dynamic history to the point of them becoming a prevalent recreational drug. This article explains and considers the history of this “wonder” mushroom 
 

Chefs globally cook them, Scientists study them, and artists use it as ink for painting. They emerge overnight, vanish quickly, leaving no trace of their presence. The fungus is now being looked as a probable treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other psychological disorders 
 

Mushrooms are a fungal growth that usually takes the form of a domed cap on a stalk, with gills underneath the lid. They are unique in the plant kingdom because they do not contain chlorophyll like green plants. Devoid of the process of photosynthesis, some mushrooms get nutrients by breaking down organic matter or by feeding on higher plants.  

For humans, mushrooms usually have three properties-nourishing, healing, or poisoning. Few are benevolent. They are used extensively in cuisine and for medicinal purposes chiefly in the continent of Asia. In the USA, studies were conducted in the early ’60s for probable ways to alter the immune system and to reduce tumor growth with extracts used in cancer research. 

The natives of Mesoamerica, for thousands of years, have used Mushrooms. The Aztecs have called it the “flesh of the gods.” There are over 180 species of mushrooms that contain the chemicals psilocybin or psilocin. Hallucinogenic mushrooms have been used in native or religious rites for centuries, especially in the Americas. Psilocybin is classified as an indole-alkylamine (tryptamine). These compounds have a similar structure to (LSD), and are abused for their hallucinogenic and euphoric effects to create a “trip.” Initially questioned by the Christian establishment globally, psilocybin use was suppressed until Western psychiatry rediscovered it after the Second World War. 

In 1957 an article in Life magazine titled “Seeking the Magic Mushroom” encouraged the interest of Americans. A year later, a Swiss scientist named Albert Hofman, identified psilocybin and psilocin as the active compounds in the “magic mushrooms.” This lead to the creation of the Harvard Psilocybin Project led by American psychologist Timothy Leary at Harvard University to learn the effects of the compound on human beings. 

In the 25 years that followed, many patients were given psilocybin. Numerous research papers were produced. Once the US government became aware of the growing subculture open to adopting the use, regulations were passed. 

The Nixon Administration introduced regulations, including the Controlled Substances Act of 1970. Psilocybin was put in the most restrictive Schedule I, along with marijuana and MDMA. Each was defined as having a “high potential for abuse, no currently accepted medical use, and a lack of accepted safety.”It effectively ended the research conducted in the previous quarter of a century.  

Then, in 2011, an American psychologist and researcher James Fadiman wrote The Psychedelic Explorer’s Guide. It introduced the term micro-dosing into popular culture, setting out suitable doses (10 micrograms of LSD every three days) and including glowing first-hand reports of improved productivity. It eventually found its way into the use of “Magic Mushrooms” as a way of controlling hallucinogenic effects. 

Conclusion 

While fungus has enthralled people for centuries, it may finally be coming into a new period where its healing powers and unidentified qualities are being discovered. The “Magic Mushroom” may contain properties that will enable us to find cures for diseases and set the stage for increased well being Shroom Hub Canada